Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior’s e-Magazine : TeknoDE

Cyber Warrior is one of the biggest hacker groups in Turkey. The group was established in 1999. Their first significant cyber-attack was in 2003, when they launched a massive operation against 1,500 U.S. websites in protest against the American invasion of Iraq and a specific incident where Turkish military personnel in northern Iraq were captured and interrogated by the U.S. Army.

Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior

Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior

Cyber Warrior (CW) comprises teams for strategy, intelligence, logistics, R&D and a dedicated unit for waging cyber-attacks named Akincilar. In recent weeks, for examples, Akincilar has attacked official government websites of countries that discriminate against their Muslim populations, in their opinion.

Additionally, CW has been active developing cyber tools and improving others. They even write instructional manuals on cyber security and have established a Cyber Academy, where they provide online training.

In September 2014, the group published their first monthly e-Magazine. The magazine is published on their online platforms and it includes cyber news items from the IT world, new technologies, cyber security, hacking news, programming and more.

September 2014 issue of TeknoDE

September 2014 issue of TeknoDE

In their first issue, they featured a cryptography contest with the top prize of a book, mug and mouse pad.

Cryptography Contest

Cryptography Contest

In their October issue, they reviewed the recently discovered Shellshock vulnerability, shared information on how to locate a lost mobile phone and discussed ways to hack into Gmail accounts, and aircraft and satellite systems.

October 2014 issue of TeknoDE

October 2014 issue of TeknoDE

A couple of weeks ago, they produced the November 2014 issue, featuring articles about credit card frauds, new Android malware and interviews with Cyber Warrior founders.

November 2014 issue of TeknoDE

 

Currently, the magazine is in Turkish and it increases awareness of the Cyber world for users, while promoting an interest in cyber security among them.

Members of the website and readers of CWTeknoDE will not only be motivated to hack, but with this magazine they will have chance to learn more about the cyber world, and methods and vulnerabilities.

Related Posts


Did Turkish Hackers Actually Hack the Israeli “Iron Dome”? on August 18, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

Turkish Government Bans Twitter and Hijacks IP Addresses for Popular DNS Providers on March 31, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

RedHack – A Turkish Delight on February 5, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

AnonGhost Targets Universities around the World

During November 2014, the popular hacker group AnonGhost attempted to deface academic websites from around the world.

Background

AnonGhost was established by a famous hacker dubbed Mauritania Attacker. The group has launched many wide-scale cyber campaigns against the U.S., Israel and other countries around the world. The group’s most popular repeat campaign is #OpIsrael, which was relaunched on April 7, 2014 (one year after its inaugural launch), targeting Israeli cyber-space.

Their most recent ongoing campaign is #OpGov, where group members attempt to hack government websites in different countries. In the following image, you can see an example of the group’s intention to hack Jamaican government websites:

#OpGov

The group has also leaked information from databases, such as emails, passwords and personal details.

Targeting Academic Websites

Recently, we noticed that AnonGhost is focusing on academic websites in the U.S., such as Washington University, Olin College of Engineering and Utah State University. On its official Facebook and Twitter accounts, the group announced that they had successfully defaced these American academic websites. In the following images, you can see the group’s post and their tweet regarding Washington University websites:

Post and Tweet

In the following image, you can see the group’s post on Facebook listing its achievements in hacking government and academic websites:

Post

Defaced Websites as Tools for Future Attacks

It should be noted that cyber researchers have recently warned about new methods used by hacktivist groups to attack users who visit defaced websites, using a malicious link that leads to a Dokta Chef Exploit Kit hosting website. The Dokta Chef EK takes advantage of a recently disclosed vulnerability that allows remote code execution related to the Internet Explorer browser. In the following image, you can see a defaced website with the malicious link (lulz.htm):a Defaced Website

Related Posts


#OpIsraelReborn Campaign launched by AnonGhost September 5, 2014 by CyInfo

#OpSaveGaza – by the Tunisian AnonGhost  July 13, 2014 by Yotam Gutman

Recycled Fuel? OpPetrol Campaign by AnonGhost leaked a large amount of credit cards details June 18, 2014 by Yotam Gutman

 

Cyber Threats to a Bank – Part 1: Cybercriminals Target Financial Institutions

Banks and other financial institutions often serve as key targets for malicious activity committed in cyber space. Owing to their large-scale financial operations, banks have always attracted scammers and thieves searching for easy ways to get rich quick. The rapid development of technologies used in the different industries has shifted banking operations to a much more virtual level, opening up new, sophisticated ways for criminal actions to be perpetrated. Aside from traditional, profit-motivated cybercrime, a large part of a bank’s technical infrastructure, such as online banking services, is located on the Internet. This exposes another Achilles’ heel of banking institutions, while serving as a weapon for ideologically motivated hackers trying to undermine a bank’s reputation and normal functioning. In this blog post we will focus on threats coming from the cybercrime arena, the next one describing the hacktivism world is to be followed.

Cybercriminals act from different vectors, such as developing malware for stealing login details for banking sites and applications, extracting credit card data from hacked databases, etc. The main motivation of cyber criminals is financial profit. Subsequently, they use closed web forums and online shops to support their illegal activity and develop new fraud schemes. In most of the cases, financial institutions face one of the following three threats:

Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) Attacks

Also called web injections, this attack method is very popular among cyber criminals targeting the financial sector. If the attack is successful, the hacker manages to infiltrate the web-session between the customer (while he is surfing the bank website) and the bank. He then intercepts the messages sent between the two parts of the conversation, including credentials and classified information, and injects new messages, without arousing the suspicion of either party.

In most cases, the injections are adjusted per victim, and are delivered via banking Trojans, Zeus for example. On closed forums, injections are sold as separate modules for banking malware, or they are offered as a tailored service for cyber criminals targeting a specific bank.

2

Examples for web injections offered for sale in Russian forums

Examples for web injections offered for sale on Russian forums

Client Detail Trading

One of the most popular areas of activity on underground forums is the trading of login details to bank websites and client personal data. Typically, this data originates from computers infected with malware designed to steal data inserted into form fields on websites. The operator of the botnet comprising these infected computers will not always use all the stolen data by himself, but may sell it to ‘professionals’ who specialize in cashing out money from these hacked accounts.

A term that should be mentioned in this context is the “drop” – a person who receives the stolen money into his account – sometimes without even knowing that he is supporting illegal activity, as legends and cover stories are frequently used. Drops are usually operated by the buyers of the login details – scammers who have a stabile infrastructure for cashing out stolen money. Posts on the subject of buying and selling credentials are frequently found on closed forums.

 Compromised Credit Cards

Online shops offering different kinds of credit card data for sale are very popular among those cyber criminals specializing in “carding.” These shops are very convenient for their users. They include numerous filtering options, thus matching the data to the scammers needs. Prices may vary considerably, depending on the rarity of the card and the demand for the data of the issuing bank, as well as elapsed time since the data theft.

Credit Cards form Home Depot breach are sold on an underground shop

Credit Cards form Home Depot breach are sold on an underground shop

Related Posts


Two New Banking Trojans Offered for Sale on the Russian Underground July 15, 2014 by Tanya_Koyfman

HACKoDROID: An Increasing Tendency Toward Smartphone-Based Attacks

New Smartphone technologies have made our lives easier. At the touch of a button, you can call a cab, pay bills, connect with your friends and even reach your personal trainer. On the other hand, the world of hacking and cracking now also has a lot of useful tools to hack your system and steal your data, using a smartphone.

We have recently seen the development and publishing of hack applications for smartphones on underground forums. The wide range of such tools means that anybody can find a suitable tool for dubious purposes. The items available include a variety of DDoS tools, wireless crackers, sniffers, network spoofers and more.

HackForum Post

HackForum Post

Most tools are only available for Android smartphones, and many require root permissions. The most popular tool for cookie theft is DroidSheep. With the help of this tool, an attacker can collect all browsing data, including logins, passwords and more, merely by using the same Wi-Fi network as the victim.

Moreover, the attacker can connect to the victim’s password-protected Wi-Fi network. There are several Wi-Fi cracking tools, for example, WIBR+ uses uploaded password databases to identify passwords common to the victim’s network. The users can also upload and update these databases. Another tool – Wi-Fi Kill – is capable of shutting down any other device connected to the same network and can intercept pictures and webpages recently visited by users of this network.

More and more tools now include more than one hacking capability. The DSploit tool features such functions as password sniffers, cookie sniffers, browsing history sniffers, and webpage redirecting. Another program, Bugtroid, contains cracking and protection applications. The owner can choose the most suitable program from a list and install it in one click. The tool offers a variety of tools to suit almost every cracking purpose.

Sniffers and DDoS Tools

Sniffers and DDoS Tools

For iOS systems, there is a limited number of hacking tools, mostly in the realm of game cracking. Examples of such tools are GameGem and iGameGuardian. These tools break games for the purpose of stealing monetary units. The most common tool for iOS is Metasploit, which contains a number of useful applications for different fields.

The tools presented above are not new, but they represent the main capabilities in the field. We are seeing a growing tendency to use portable devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to conduct attacks in public places. Mobile devices and public Wi-Fi networks tend to be less protected and more vulnerable. With the help of collected data by mobile device, the attackers can perform more complex attacks via PC. As long as there is no protection awareness regarding mobile devices, we expected a continued increase in the number of smartphone-based attacks.

List of Hacking Tools

List of Hacking Tools

Latin America Battles Human Rights Online

Following centuries of struggle, Latin American countries succeeded in gaining independence in the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. Notwithstanding, it is a well-known fact that today there is no equal financial distribution between the different classes in Latin American society.

In an attempt to overcome these significant class differences and protect the lower classes in Latin American countries, many human rights groups were created. However, this post refers to very different groups that are fighting for their rights in a more modern way – from behind a computer screen.

Most of these groups have a very similar agenda and they know that the best way to succeed lies in garnering the assistance of hacktivists from all over the continent and even further afield.

Via the computer, they are calling out to the people to protest against government laws and restrictions. Take, for example, the case of #4octrodealadictadurawhere Anonymous exposes police brutality and violence against unarmed protesters.

Violent Clashes

Police arrests protestors

Protestors document the violence

Protestors document the violence

Their main activity is hacking and defacing important websites. Sometimes they even leak information from databases. Their targets are mostly webpages affiliated with the government, politicians and candidates, and large enterprises such as railroad companies, newspapers and local authorities.

Almost all of the groups identify with Anonymous. One of the more prominent of these groups is Anonymous Peru, which claims to be striving for a country with no corruption, and calls to protect the human and civil rights of the citizens of Peru. The group created #OpIndependenciaPeru  and claims to have attacked government websites on Peruvian Independence day on July 28, 2014. During this operation, they alleged that they leaked candidate information, defaced ISP in Argentina and hacked a Peruvian government website.

Anonymous Peru Twitter

Another notable group is MexicanH Team from Mexico. The group identifies with Anonymous Mexico and is very popular (with over 21,000 followers on Twitter). The group launched #OpTequilatargeting Mexico’s Independence Day on September 15, 2014. During the campaign, the group hacked the website of the presidency (using an XSS vulnerability). They also leaked government email addresses, usernames and passwords.

XSS vulnerability in the president website

Database leakage

The latest hacktivist group to capture attention is TeamHackArgentino. The goals of this group are to show that the government’s politics are as bad as the security of their websites, and to demonstrate the fact that they posted an archive of their attacks on two different websites.

TeamHackArgentino Twitter

TeamHackArgentino Twitter

In conclusion, all of these groups help each other to fight against their governments, in an effort to rouse them and make them aware of the unjust acts being perpetrated against the people of Latin America, especially the poor.

WhatsHack: WhatsApp in Cyberspace

WhatsApp Messenger is an instant messaging subscription service. In addition to text messaging, users can send each other images, video and audio media messages, as well as location data. As of September 2014, WhatsApp is the most popular global messaging app, with 600 million users. Aside from regular users, more underground communities like to use this application. WhatsApp activity is more complicated to monitor by a third party than regular phone messages and some online services. WhatsApp has proven to be a fast, reliable and inexpensive service for sharing various kinds of information.

The cyber underground is also seeking new platforms for chatting and sharing information. Lately, we have identified an increasing number of hacker-affiliated groups using WhatsApp services. These groups offer members chat services, hacking tips, cyberattack coordination and more. Members from numerous countries, including Bangladesh, Pakistan, Indonesia and others, expose their phone numbers to connect to such groups.

Facebook hacktivist post

Facebook hacktivist post

There are several manuals describing how to access other WhatsApp accounts. One post shared two different methodologies to do just that: spoofing with the help of Mac number, and using spy software. This post received over 738,000 views over a two-week period.

WhatsApp hacking guide

WhatsApp hacking guide

In addition to spy methodology, you can find various tools, such as WhatsApp Hack Spy Tool, WhatsAppSniffer, WhatsApp Xtract, WhatsApp Conversation SPY Hack Tool and more. You can also use third party spyware. These tools can be used for Android, iPhone and BlackBerry devices. Tools provide such features as tracking all voice notes, viewing all user chat logs, updating profile pictures, sending messages to contacts, changing profile status and more, depending on the tool.

WhatsApp hacking tools

WhatsApp hacking tools

The dissemination of such tools is becoming common also on social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. A Facebook page titled “WhatsApp Hack Spy Tool” has 390 members, mostly from India, Italy, France and the U.S. This page also has a related Twitter account with more than 3,500 followers. Another Facebook page titled “WhatsApp Hack Sniffer Spy Tool” has over 13,500 members, mostly from Turkey and India. Furthermore, advertisement for the tool can also be found on LinkedIn.

LinkedIn advertisement for the tool

LinkedIn advertisement for the tool

In addition to the free tools, you can purchase more unique software, such as a tool for hacking WhatsApp, only ten copies of which were released for sale on the DarkNet for 0.0305 BTC.

The tool is sold on the DarkNet

The tool is sold on the DarkNet

The use of WhatsApp by hacktivist communities, together with the development of hacking tools and methodologies, has opened up a new platform for the cyber community. These two directions provide a fast, inexpensive and more secure way for hacktivists to interact, coordinate operations, and exchange information and mobile hacking techniques and data vulnerabilities.

Spotlight on the Russian Underground Infrastructure

The media is in an uproar at present, reporting on one cyber incident after another. Adobe, Target, Neiman Marcus, Home Depot, JP Morgan – these breaches are just the tip of the iceberg in the cybercrime arena. The Russian underground forums serve as fertile ground for planning cybercrime-motivated breaches worldwide – programming the malicious software, distributing it and sharing knowledge about the most profitable usage, selling the stolen data (such as credentials, etc.). Let us take a deeper look at the internal structure of these forums and the norms of behavior there.

Registration

While many forums have free registration, others require payment (Cybercriminals will never miss an opportunity to profitJ). Some of the forums that ask for registration fees do not contain useful information, and the fee is merely a farce, while for others, the fee is a means to keep poor or noob hackers away from the “big guy discussions.” Some of the forums ask potential candidates to fill out a detailed registration form, clarifying exact capabilities/programming languages they know, while others go one step further and send different hacking tasks to the applicants, demanding proof of their professional level. Many forums have strict policies about filtering out the registrants and very few people are accepted.

Registration page in one of the underground forums

Registration page in one of the underground forums

Communication

When it comes to personal contacts between the seller and buyer, the first choice is the Jabber messenger. Sometimes, one of the sides will request an OTR (Off-the-Record, allowing private conversation using encryption and elimination of all traces of the conversation) protocol for Jabber. Besides, exchanging messages via PM (private message) – the private mailbox on each forum is another popular means of communication. Users wishing to connect via Jabber are sometimes asked to authenticate themselves via private message beforehand – indicating the high level of confidentiality and security concerns.

ICQ is also used, although it is not very common and is perceived as a communication method for less experienced hackers.

Payment

On the underground, you will never see any payment method that would somehow enable identification of the parties in the transaction. Naturally, no credit cards, PayPal accounts or money transactions are accepted – only virtual currencies are used. BTC is rather popular, as well as PM (Perfect Money), LTC (Light Coins), WM (Web Money) and other virtual currencies.

Escrow System

Most of the forums maintain a well-established system of escrow services provided by an official forum member appointed by the administrator. In exchange for a reward, usually a percentage of the transaction value, he mediates between the buyer and the seller, keeping the money until the goods are supplied. He also checks that the product offered matches its description.

Reputation Score

The reputation of the members is one of the pillars of Russian underground forums. Despite the fact that each forum has its own scoring system, all have a common principle: forum members rate each other, based on the threads they post. For instance, by providing useful advice or uploading malware, the author will receive more points. Another reputation booster is the number of posts, as well as seniority on the forum that defines the status of the user: beginner, intermediate, specialist, etc. Certain threads are available only to members with a minimum numbers of posts.

Furthermore, some forums ask for monetary deposits that are displayed next to the user’s name, indicating his reliability. If monetary conflict arises, the sales thread will often be suspended until the issue is clarified. If no solution is found, the seller incurs a “ripper” status, thus losing the chance to sell anything ever again on the forum, unless he changes his nickname.

Member's profile in one of the underground forums

Member’s profile in one of the underground forums