Gods, Monsters and Pandas – Threats Lurking in the Cyber Realm

With new viruses constantly being developed and new groups being formed all the time, hackers should use their creative minds to come up with original names to distinguish their tools/group from the rest. While some names are rather trite and corny, others are more amusing and curious. Generally speaking, the names usually fall under one of about ten categories. Here are a few examples:

The following are some elaborations on specific names:

Torshammer666: Thor’s hammer, or Mjölnir in Norse mythology, is depicted as one of the most powerful weapons, forged by the skillful hands of the dwarves. However, it seems that one Nordic god was not enough for this specific hacker, so he walked the extra mile and added the ominous number 666 to the tool name, to create an intimidating effect stemming from the thought of a Nordic-Satanic-almighty-weapon.

Fallaga: The famous Tunisian hacker group Fallaga is named after the anti-colonial movement that fought for the independence of Tunisia (there were also Fallaga warriors in Algeria). The character in the group’s logo resembles the original Fallaga fighters.

熊猫烧香 (Panda Burning Incense) – Everybody loves those adorable, chubby, harmless bears called Pandas! They are native to China, and serve as its national animal and mascot. As such, it is no wonder that panda-themed characters and cartoons figure extensively in China in various contexts, often symbolically representing China internationally. And now the pandas have even invaded the virus realm! In 2006-2007 the 熊猫烧香 virus infected millions of computers throughout China and led to the first-ever arrests in the country under virus-spreading charges. The ultimate goal of the virus was to install password-stealing Trojans, but it was its manifestation on the victim’s device that attracted a lot of attention: the virus replaced all infected files icons with a cute image of a panda holding three incense sticks in its hands, hence the name “Panda Burning Incense.”

Bozok (Turkish) – It may refer to one of the two branches (along with Üçok) in Turkish and Turkic legendary history from which three sons of Oghuz Khan (Günhan, Ayhan, and Yıldızhan) and their 12 clans are traced (from Wikipedia.)

推杆熊猫 (Putter Panda, putter=golf stick) – Another Panda-themed name. It is widely recognized that golf is the sport of white collar professionals, usually those on the upper end of the salary ladder. That is why, when these prominent figures travel abroad to a convention or on a business trip (and engage in semi-business/semi-pleasure golf activities), they are sometimes subjected to sophisticated hacker attacks, usually initiated by their host country, as suspected in the case of Putter Panda and its ties with the Chinese government.

As you read these lines, more tools are being written, and we can expect to continue to see more intriguing names. The Chinese idiom 卧虎藏龙 (literally: “crouching tiger, hidden dragon”), which was the inspiration for the successful namesake movie, nowadays actually means “hidden, undiscovered talents.” Maybe it is time the gifted tigers and dragons of the hacker community climbed out of their dark caves, stopped performing illegal activities, and put their pooled talents (be they computing or copywriting) to good use?

 


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