The Healthcare Sector is Targeted by Cybercriminals More than Ever

The healthcare sector has recently become a desirable target for cyber crooks. According to Symantec ISTR report statistics, healthcare was the most breached sub-sector in 2015, comprising almost 40% of all the attacks. Hospital security systems are generally less secure than those of financial organizations, as monetary theft has always been perceived as the greatest threat for organizations, and dangers to other sectors were usually underestimated. Moreover, awareness of cyber-attacks against hospitals and medical centers is much lower than it is to financial cybercrime, and as a result, the employees are less well-trained on how to avoid falling victim to a cyber-attack.

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Top 10 Sub-Sectors Breached by Number of Incidents According to Symantec ISTR report

Only lately, this concept has started to be challenged, revealing the potential damage that can be caused by the theft and leakage of patient data. However, the ‘bad guys’ remain one step ahead and during the last few months, we have witnessed a spate of attacks targeting the healthcare industry: ransomware attacks encrypting essential data and demanding payment of a ransom, numerous data leakages revealing confidential patient data, unauthorized access to medical networks and even the hacking of medical devices, such as pumps and X-ray equipment.

Moreover, the healthcare sector is being targeted by hackers not only directly, but also via third-party companies in the supply chain, such as equipment and drug suppliers. These companies usually store some confidential data that originates in the hospitals’ databases and may even have access to the hospital IT systems, but they are far less secure than the hospitals themselves. Thus, they serve as a preferable infiltration point for malicious actors pursuing the theft of medical data and attempting to infiltrate the hospitals’ networks.

The consequences of attacks on the healthcare industry may be extensive, including the impairment of the medical center functioning, which may result in danger to human lives in the worst case scenario. In other cases, personal data will be stolen and sold on underground markets. Cybercriminals will take advantages of these personal details for identity theft or for future cyber-attacks combining social engineering based on the stolen details.

While monitoring closed Deep-Web and Darknet sources, SenseCy analysts recently noticed a growing interest toward the healthcare sector among cyber criminals. Databases of medical institutions are traded on illicit marketplaces and closed forums, along with access to their servers. In the last few months alone, we came across several occurrences indicating extensive trade of medical records and access to servers where this data is stored.

The first case, in May 2016, was the sale of RDP access for a large clinic group with several branches in the central U.S., which was offered for sale on a Darknet closed forum. For a payment of $50,000 Bitcoins, the buyer would receive access to the compromised workstation, with access to 3 GB of data stored on four hard disks. Additionally, the workstation allows access to an aggregate electronical system (EHR) for managing medical records, where data regarding patients, suppliers, payments and more can be exploited.

Although the seller did not mention the origin of the credentials he was selling, he claimed that local administrator privileges could be received on the compromised system. He also specified that 45 users from the medical personnel were logged into the system from the workstation he hacked.

The relatively high price for this offer indicates the high demand for medical information. With RDP access, the potential attackers can perform any action on the compromised workstation: install malware, encrypt the files or erase them, infect other machines in the network and access any data stored in the network. The consequences can be tremendous.

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An excerpt of the sale thread posted on a Darknet forum

 

3
Screenshot allegedly taken on the hacked workstation

Just a few weeks later, in June 2016, our analysts detected another cyber-accident related to healthcare. This time, three databases allegedly stolen via an RDP access to a medical organization were offered for sale for more than $500,000 on a dedicated Darknet marketplace. In one of his posts, the seller claimed that one of the databases belongs to a large American health insurer.

4
One of the sales posts on a Darknet marketplace
5
Screenshot posted by the seller as a proof of hacking into a medical organization

Before long, we again discovered evidence of hacking into a medical-related organization, this time by Russian-speaking hackers. On one of the forums we monitor, a member tried to sell an SSH access to the server of an American company supplying equipment to 130 medical center in the U.S. He uploaded screenshots proving that he accessed the server where personal data of patients is stored.

The conclusions following these findings are concerning. An extensive trade in medical information and compromised workstations and servers is a common sight on underground illegal markets. This business generates hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars annually, ensuring its continuation as long as there are such high profits to those involved. Since the ramifications can be grave, the healthcare sector must take all necessary measures to protect their systems and data:

  1. Implement a strong password policy, because many hacks are a result of brute-force attack. Strong passwords and two-factor authentications to log into organizational systems should be the number one rule for medical organizations.
  2. Deploy suitable security systems.
  3. Instruct the employees to follow cyber security rules – choosing strong and unique passwords, spotting phishing email messages, avoiding clicking on links and downloading files from unknown sources, etc. Consider periodic training for employees on these issues to maintain high awareness and compliance with the rules.
  4. Use Cyber Threat Intelligence (CTI) – to keep up with the times regarding the current most prominent threats to your organization and industry.
  5. Keep all software updated.

Handling a Ransomware Attack

A recent wave of ransomware attacks has hit countries around the world, with a large number of infections reported in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and Israel. It appears that the attackers have no specific target, since the attacks have struck hospitals, financial institutions and private institutions, indicating that no specific industry has been targeted.

In Israel, two types of ransomware were identified in the most recent attacks: the familiar TeslaCrypt and the new ransomware, Locky.

The Evolution of Ransomware

The vigorous usage of ransomware tools by cybercriminals and their success in this area has led to the development of new ransomware and the constant upgrading of known models. During the past several months, researchers have reported on the development of ransomware that is capable of file encryption without Internet connection, i.e., they do not communicate with their C&C servers for the encryption process.

New ransomware tools that were reported are Locky ransomware, whose modus operandi resembles the Dridex banking Trojan, and a new version of CTB-Locker that attacks web servers.

Additionally, RaaS (Ransom-as-a-Service) offers are becoming popular on closed DeepWeb and Darknet forums. These services allow potential attackers to easily create ransomware stubs, paying with profits from future successful infections. Recently, we identified a new RaaS dubbed Cerber ransomware, which is offered on a Russian underground forum. Previously it was ORX-Locker, offered as a service via a platform hosted on an .onion server.

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The ransom message presented by the Cerber ransomware

Ransomware Distribution

The majority of the distribution vectors of ransomware stubs involve some kind of social engineering trap, for example, email messages including malicious Office files, spam messages with nasty links or malvertising campaigns exploiting vulnerable WordPress or Joomla websites with an embedded malevolent code. The distribution also takes advantage of Macro commands and exploit kits, such as Nuclear or Angler. Sometimes browser vulnerabilities are exploited, as well as stolen digital certificates.

In November 2015, attempts to deliver ransomware to Israeli clients were identified. In this case, the attackers spoofed a corporate email address and tried to make recipients believe the email was sent from a company worker.

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RaaS offered on a Darknet forum

Handling a Ransomware Attack

Please find below our suggestions for recommended action to avoid ransomware attacks on an organization, and how to deal with an attack after infection:

Defend Your Organization from Potential Threats

  • Train your employees – since the human link is the weakest link in the organizational cybersecurity and the majority of the cases involve social engineering on one of the employees, periodical employee briefing is extremely important. Specify the rules regarding using the company systems, and describe what phishing messages look like.
  • Raise awareness regarding accepting files that arrive via email messages – instruct your employees not to open suspicious files or files sent from unfamiliar senders. Consider implementing an organizational policy addressing such files. We recommend blocking or isolating files with the following extensions: js (JavaScript), jar (Java), bat (Batch file), exe (executable file), cpl (Control Panel), scr (Screensaver), com (COM file) and pif (Program Information file).
  • Disable running of Macro scripts on Office files sent via email – in recent months, many cases of ransomware attacks employing this vector were reported. Usually, Macro commands are disabled by default and we do not recommend enabling them. In addition, we suggest using Office Viewer software to open Word and Excel files.
  • Limit user privileges and constantly monitor the workstations – careful management of user privileges and limited administrator’s privileges may help in avoiding the spread of the ransomware in the organizational network. Moreover, monitoring the activity on workstations will be useful for early detection of any infection and blocking it from propagating to other systems and network resources.
  • Create rules that block programs from executing from AppData/LocalAppData folders. Many variants of the analyzed ransomware are executed from these directories, including CryptoLocker. Therefore, the creation of such rules may reduce the encryption risk significantly.
  • Install a Russian keyboard – while monitoring closed Russian forums where several ransomware families originated, we discovered that many of them will check if the infected computer is located in a post-Soviet country. Usually, this check is performed by detecting which keyboard layout is installed on the machine. If a Russian (or other post-Soviet language) keyboard layout is detected, the ransomware will not initiate the encryption process.
  • Keep your systems updated – in many cases, hackers take advantage of outdated systems to infiltrate the network. Therefore, frequent updates of the organizational systems and implementing the published security patch will significantly reduce the chances of infection.
  • Use third-party dedicated software to deal with the threat – many programs aimed at addressing specific ransomware threats are constantly being released. One is Windows AppLocker, which is included in the OS and assists in dealing with malware. We recommend contacting the organizational security vendor and considering the offered solutions.
  • Implement technical indicator and YARA rules in the company organizations. We provide our clients with intelligence items accompanied by technical indicators. Additionally, a dedicated repository that includes ransomware indicators was launched.
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    A closed forum member looks to blackmail companies using ransomware

    What if I am Already Infected?

  • Restore your files – some ransomware tools create a copy of the file, encrypt it and then erase the original file. If the deletion is performed via the OS erase feature, there is a chance to restore the files, since in majority of the cases, the OS does not immediately overwrite the deleted filed.
  • Decryption of the encrypted files – the decryption will be possible if you were infected by one of these three ransomware types: Bitcryptor, CoinVault or Linux.Encoder.1. Therefore, detecting the exact kind of ransomware that attacked the PC is crucial.
  • Back-up files on a separate storage device regularly – the best practice to avoid damage from a ransomware attack is to backup all your important files on a storage disconnected from the organizational network, since some ransomware variants are capable of encrypting files stored on connected devices. For example, researchers recently reported a ransomware that encrypted files stored on the Cloud Sync folder.
  • If ransomware is detected in the organization, immediately disconnect the infected machine from the network. Do not try to remove the malware or to reboot the system before identifying the ransomware. In some cases, performing one of these actions will make the decryption impossible, even after paying the ransom.

ORX-Locker – A Darknet Ransomware That Even Your Grandmother Can Use

Written by Ran L. and Mickael S.

The bar for becoming a cyber-criminal has never been so low. Whether buying off-the-shelf malware or writing your own, with a small investment, anyone can make a profit. Now it seems that the bar has been lowered even further with the creation of a new Darknet site that offers Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS), titled ORX-Locker.

Ransomware-as-a-Service enables a user with no knowledge or cash to create his own stubs and use them to infect systems. If the victim decides to pay, the ransom goes to the service provider, who takes a percent of the payment and forwards the rest to the user. For cyber-criminals, this is a win-win situation. The user who cannot afford to buy the ransomware or does not have the requisite knowledge can acquire it for free, and the creator gets his ransomware spread without any effort from his side.

This is not the first time we have seen this kind of service. McAfee previously (May, 2015) reported on Tox. While Tox was the first ransomware-as-a-service, it seems that ORX has taken the idea one step further, with AV evasion methods and complex communication techniques, and apparently also using universities and other platforms as its infrastructure.

In the “August 2015 IBM Security IBM X-Force Threat Intelligence Quarterly, 3Q 2015,” published on Monday (August 24, 2015), IBM mentioned TOX while predicting: “This simplicity may spread rapidly to more sophisticated but less common ransomware attack paradigms and lead to off-the-shelf offerings in the cloud.” Just one day later, a post was published on a closed Darknet forum regarding the new ORX-Locker service.

ORX – First Appearance

On August 25, 2015, a user dubbed orxteam published a post regarding the new ransomware service. The message, which was part of his introduction post – a mandatory post every new user has to make to be accepted to the forum – described the new ORX-Locker ransomware as a service platform. In the introduction, the user presented himself as Team ORX, a group that provides private locker software (their name for ransomware) and also ransomware-as-a-service platform.

ORX team introduction post in a closed Darknet hacking forum.
ORX Team introduction post in a closed Darknet hacking forum.

ORX Locker Online Platform

Team ORX has built a Darknet website dedicated to the new public service. To enter the site, new users just need to register. No email or other identification details are required. Upon registration, users have the option to enter a referral username, which will earn them three percent from every payment made to the new user. After logging in, the user can move between five sections:

Home – the welcome screen where you users can see statistics on how much system has been locked by their ransom, how many victims decided to pay, how much they earned and their current balance.

Build EXE – Team ORX has made the process of creating a stub so simple that the only thing a user needs to do is to enter an ID number for his stub (5 digits max) and the ransom price (ORX put a minimum of $75). After that, the user clicks on the Build EXE button and the stub is created and presented in a table with all other stubs previously created by the user.

ORX-Locker Darknet platform, which enables every registered user to build his own ransomware stub.
ORX-Locker Darknet platform, which enables every registered user to build his own ransomware stub.

Stats – This section presents the user with information on systems infected with his stub, including the system OS, how many files have been encrypted, time and date of infection, how much profit has been generated by each system, etc.

Wallet – following a successful infection, the user can withdraw his earnings and transfer them to a Bitcoin address of his choosing.

Support – This section provides general information on the service, including more information on how to build the stub and a mail address (orxsupport@safe-mail[.]net) that users can contact if they require support.

Ransomware

When a user downloads the created stub, he gets a zip file containing the stub, in the form of an “.exe” file. Both the zip and the stub names consist of a random string, 20-characters long. Each file has a different name.

Once executed, the ransomware starts communicating with various IP addresses. The following is a sample from our analysis:

  1. 130[.]75[.]81[.]251 – Leibniz University of Hanover
  2. 130[.]149[.]200[.]12 – Technical University of Berlin
  3. 171[.]25[.]193[.]9 – DFRI (Swedish non-profit and non-party organization working for digital rights)
  4. 199[.]254[.]238[.]52 – Riseup (Riseup provides online communication tools for people and groups working on liberatory social change)

As you can see, some of the addresses are related to universities and others to organizations with various agendas.

Upon activation, the ransomware connects to the official TOR project website and downloads the TOR client. The malware then transmits data over this channel. Using hidden services for communication is a trend that has been adopted by most known ransomware tools in the last year, as was the case of Cryptowall 3.0. In our analysis, the communication was over the standard 9050 port and over 49201.

The final piece would be the encryption of files on the victim’s machine. Unlike other, more “target oriented” ransomware, this particular one locks all files, changing the file ending to .LOCKED and deletes the originals.

When the ransomware finishes encrypting the files, a message will popup announcing that all the files were encrypted, and a payment instruction file will be created on the desktop.

After the ransomware finishes encrypting the files, a message will popup announcing that all the files were encrypted
After the ransomware finishes encrypting the files, a message will popup announcing that all the files were encrypted

In the payment instruction file (.html), the victim receives a unique payment ID and a link to the payment website, located on the onion network (rkcgwcsfwhvuvgli[.]onion). After entering the site using the payment ID, the victim receives another set of instructions in order to complete the payment.

ORX-Locker payment platform which has a dedicated site located on the onion network.
ORX-Locker payment platform, which has a dedicated site located on the onion network.

Finally, although some basic persistence and anti-AV mechanisms are present, the malware still has room to “grow.” We are certain that as its popularity grows, more developments and enhancements will follow.

YARA rule:

rule ORXLocker
{
meta:
author = “SenseCy”
date = “30/08/15”
description = “ORXLocker_yara_rule”

strings:
$string0 = {43 61 6e 27 74 20 63 6f 6d 70 6c 65 74 65 20 53 4f 43 4b 53 34 20 63 6f 6e 6e 65 63 74 69 6f 6e 20 74 6f 20 25 64 2e 25 64 2e 25 64 2e 25 64 3a 25 64 2e 20 28 25 64 29 2c 20 72 65 71 75 65 73 74 20 72 65 6a 65 63 74 65 64 20 62 65 63 61 75 73 65 20 74 68 65 20 63 6c 69 65 6e 74 20 70 72 6f 67 72 61 6d 20 61 6e 64 20 69 64 65 6e 74 64 20 72 65 70 6f 72 74 20 64 69 66 66 65 72 65 6e 74 20 75 73 65 72 2d 69 64 73 2e}
$string1 = {43 61 6e 27 74 20 63 6f 6d 70 6c 65 74 65 20 53 4f 43 4b 53 35 20 63 6f 6e 6e 65 63 74 69 6f 6e 20 74 6f 20 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 30 32 78 25 30 32 78 3a 25 64 2e 20 28 25 64 29}
$string2 = {53 4f 43 4b 53 35 3a 20 73 65 72 76 65 72 20 72 65 73 6f 6c 76 69 6e 67 20 64 69 73 61 62 6c 65 64 20 66 6f 72 20 68 6f 73 74 6e 61 6d 65 73 20 6f 66 20 6c 65 6e 67 74 68 20 3e 20 32 35 35 20 5b 61 63 74 75 61 6c 20 6c 65 6e 3d 25 7a 75 5d}
$string3 = {50 72 6f 78 79 20 43 4f 4e 4e 45 43 54 20 66 6f 6c 6c 6f 77 65 64 20 62 79 20 25 7a 64 20 62 79 74 65 73 20 6f 66 20 6f 70 61 71 75 65 20 64 61 74 61 2e 20 44 61 74 61 20 69 67 6e 6f 72 65 64 20 28 6b 6e 6f 77 6e 20 62 75 67 20 23 33 39 29}
$string4 = {3c 61 20 68 72 65 66 3d 68 74 74 70 73 3a 2f 2f 72 6b 63 67 77 63 73 66 77 68 76 75 76 67 6c 69 2e 74 6f 72 32 77 65 62 2e 6f 72 67 3e 68 74 74 70 73 3a 2f 2f 72 6b 63 67 77 63 73 66 77 68 76 75 76 67 6c 69 2e 74 6f 72 32 77 65 62 2e 6f 72 67 3c 2f 61 3e 3c 62 72 3e}
$string5 = {43 3a 5c 44 65 76 5c 46 69 6e 61 6c 5c 52 65 6c 65 61 73 65 5c 6d 61 69 6e 2e 70 64 62}
$string6 = {2e 3f 41 56 3f 24 62 61 73 69 63 5f 6f 66 73 74 72 65 61 6d 40 44 55 3f 24 63 68 61 72 5f 74 72 61 69 74 73 40 44 40 73 74 64 40 40 40 73 74 64 40 40}
$string7 = {2e 3f 41 56 3f 24 62 61 73 69 63 5f 69 6f 73 40 5f 57 55 3f 24 63 68 61 72 5f 74 72 61 69 74 73 40 5f 57 40 73 74 64 40 40 40 73 74 64 40 40}
$string8 = “ttp://4rhfxsrzmzilheyj.onion/get.php?a=” wide
$string9 = “\\Payment-Instructions.htm” wide

condition:
all of them
}

Shell Profiles on the Russian Underground

Russian underground cyber-markets are known venues for purchasing high-quality hacking tools and services. Many such tools, popular worldwide, make their first appearances on closed Russian forums. There are two main types of sellers on these platforms: well-known members with seniority and strong reputations, who have already sold tools and received positive buyer feedback, and an emerging “shell profile” type of user. According to our recent analysis, such users typically register to a forum a few days before posting an advertisement for the tool. These new users often enlist the aid of forum administrators and more senior members, by providing them with a copy of the tool for their review, and thus gain the trust of potential buyers.

CTB-Locker

For example, CTB-Locker, a malware program, was first advertised on a Russian underground forum on June 10, 2014 by a user called Tapkin. This ransomware scans the computer for data files, encrypts them with a unique algorithm, and demands a ransom to release them. Tapkin registered on this forum on June 2, 2014, several days before posting the advertisement, and posted a total of five messages to the forum, all on the subject of CTB-Locker. Around this time, a user by the same name posted identical information on other forums.

Tapkin registered to another Russian underground forum on June 13, 2014, and three days later, he advertised the tool on the forum. This was the first and only thread that Tapkin started on this platform, and all of his posts were about this topic.

Tapkin stopped selling CTB-Locker on June 27, but on November 19, 2014, he posted another advertisement, this time for “serious” clients only. Tapkin last advertised the ransomware on a carding forum on December 8, 2014, after registering to this forum the same day.

Thus, in three cases, Tapkin registered to a forum a few days before posting an advertisement for the tool and did not participate in any other forum discussions. As a newly created profile, Tapkin lacked seniority and therefore had low credibility. However, our impression is that this user demonstrates knowledge regarding the tool, its capabilities and can answer questions regarding the technical component of the tool fluently. An analysis of Tapkin’s posts indicates that behind the shell profile is not one person, but rather a group of people who developed the tool together.

Forum comments indicating the presence of a team behind the username Tapkin
Forum comments indicating the presence of a team behind the username Tapkin

This username appears to have been created for the sole purpose of selling the ransomware, which was only advertised on Russian-speaking platforms. On May 19, 2015, a well-known forum user posted a message stating that his computer had been infected by CTB-Locker and asking for Tapkin. However, Tapkin had by then already disappeared.

Forum member post searching for Tapkin in correlation with CTB-Locker
Forum member post searching for Tapkin in correlation with CTB-Locker

Loki Bot

Another example of malware advertised by a new forum member is the Loki Bot password and coin wallet stealer. Loki Bot, written in C++, can steal passwords from browsers, FTP/SSH applications, email accounts, and poker clients. It has an option to configure C&C IP addresses or domains.

Bot-selling advertisement
Bot-selling advertisement

This bot, which works on Windows versions XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1, is relatively new and is still under development. It was first advertised on a well-known Russian underground forum in early May 2015 by a new user with no reputation. A week later, a user by the same name registered on two other well-known underground forums attempted to boost his credibility by sending the forum administrator a test version of the malware. Similar to the previous example, we assume that a group of people is behind this user as well.

Forum administrator approves a new tool advertised by a “shell profile” user (May 18, 2015)
Forum administrator approves a new tool advertised by a “shell profile” user (May 18, 2015)

We can see that new users are registering on Russian underground forums for one purpose only, to sell a particular malware program, and their entire online presence is focused on this. They register to a forum a few days before posting an advertisement for the tool and do not participate in other forum discussions. Newly created profiles lack seniority and therefore have low credibility ratings. Sometimes such users attempt to improve their credibility by sending the forum administrator a test version of the malware. In some cases we can see that behind the shell profile there is a team, and not an individual. They appear suddenly and disappear just as suddenly after their business is completed.

SenseCy 2014 Annual Cyber Intelligence Report

Written and prepared by SenseCy’s Cyber Intelligence analysts.

Executive Summary

Clearly, 2014 was an important year in the cyber arena. The technical level of the attacks, the variety of tools and methods used and the destructive results achieved have proven, yet again, that cyber is a cross-border tool that is rapidly gaining momentum.

This year, we witnessed attacks on key vectors: cyber criminals setting their sights on targets in the private sector, hacktivists using cyber tools for their ideological struggles, state-sponsored campaigns to facilitate spying on high-profile targets, and cyber conflicts between countries.

The following is an excerpt from an annual report prepared by our Cyber Intelligence analysts. To receive a copy, please send a request to: info@sensecy.com

Insights

Below are several of our insights regarding cyber activity this past year:

  • The financial sector was and continues to be a key target for cyber criminals, with most of the corporations hacked this year in the U.S. being attacked through infection of Point-of-Sale (POS) systems. Despite the high level of awareness as to the vulnerability of these systems following the Target breach at the end of 2013, ever more organizations are continuing to fall victim to these types of attacks, as the cybercrime community develops and sells dedicated tools for these systems.
  • In 2014, we saw another step up in the use of cyber as a cross-border weapon, the use of which can be highly destructive. This was evidenced in the attack on JPMorgan, which according to reports was a response to sanctions imposed by the U.S. on Russia. The ensuing Sony breach and threats to peoples’ lives should the movie The Interview be screened exacerbated the state of asymmetrical war in cyber space, where on the one hand, we see countries attacking companies, and on the other, groups of hackers attacking countries. This trend becomes even more concerning following the reports of the deaths of three workers at a nuclear reactor in South Korea, after it became the target of a targeted cyber-attack, evidently by North Korean entities.
  • This past year was rife with campaigns by anti-Israel hacktivist campaigns, whose motivation for attacking Israel’s cyber networks was especially strong. Again, it was clearly demonstrated that the relationship between physical and virtual space is particularly strong, when alongside Operation Protective Edge (July-August 2014), we witnessed a targeted cyber campaign by hacktivist organizations from throughout the Muslim world (but not only) and by cyber terror groups, which in some cases were able to score significant successes. We believe that in 2015, attacks by hacktivist groups will become higher quality (DDoS attacks at high bandwidth, for example) and the use of vectors, which to date have been less common, such as attacks against mobile devices, will become increasingly frequent.
  • Involvement of the internal factor in cyber-attacks: According to some speculations published recently in the global media regarding the massive Sony breach, former company employees  may have abused their positions and status to steal confidential information and try to harm the organization. This underscores the importance of information security and internal compartmentalization in organizations with databases containing sensitive information.

The Past Year on the Russian Underground

In 2014, we saw active underground trading of malware and exploits, with some of them being used in attacks inside and outside Russia that gained widespread media coverage in sources dealing with information security.

The following is a list of categories of malware and the main services offered for sale in 2014 on the Russian-speaking underground forums. Note that in this analysis, we only included important tools that were well-received by the buyers, which indicates their reliability and level of professionalism. Additionally, only tools that were sold for over a month were included. Let us also note that the analysis does not include special PoS firmware, but only programs designed to facilitate remote information theft through takeover of the terminal.

Malware_Russian Underground

Prices

The average price of a tool offered for sale in 2014 was $1,500. Since 2013, the average price has increased by $500. The following graph lists the average price in each of the categories outlined above (in USD):

Average_Price_by_Category

Key Trends Observed on the Russian Underground this Past Year

Trojan Horses for the Financial Sector

Malware designed to target financial institutions is a highly sought-after product on the Russian underground, and this past year we observed the development of malware based on Kronos source code – Zeus, Chthonic (called Udacha by the seller) and Dyre malware. Additionally, the sale of tools designed to sell login details for banking sites via mobile devices were also observed.

In this context, it should be noted that the modular structure of many types of financial malware allows flexibility by both the seller and the buyer. Most financial malware is sold in this format – meaning, various modules responsible for the malware’s activity can be purchased separately: Formgrabber module, Web-Injections module and more.

MitM Attacks

This type of attack vector, known to cyber criminals as Web injections, is most common as a module in Trojan horses for the financial sector. Members of many forums offer their services as injection writers, referring to creation of malware designed to be integrated into a specific banking Trojan horse (generally based on Zeus), tailored to the specific bank, which imitates the design of its windows, etc. In 2014, we saw this field prosper, with at least seven similar services offered on the various forums.

Ransomware

This year we witnessed a not insignificant amount of ransomware for sale on Russian-speaking forums. It would appear that the forums see a strong potential for profit through this attack vector and therefore invest in the development of ransomware. Furthermore, note that some of the ransomware uses the Tor network to better conceal the command and control servers. Since CryptoLocker was discovered in September 2013, we have seen numerous attempts at developing similar malware both for PCs and laptops.

Additional trends and insights are detailed in the full report.

HACKoDROID: An Increasing Tendency Toward Smartphone-Based Attacks

New Smartphone technologies have made our lives easier. At the touch of a button, you can call a cab, pay bills, connect with your friends and even reach your personal trainer. On the other hand, the world of hacking and cracking now also has a lot of useful tools to hack your system and steal your data, using a smartphone.

We have recently seen the development and publishing of hack applications for smartphones on underground forums. The wide range of such tools means that anybody can find a suitable tool for dubious purposes. The items available include a variety of DDoS tools, wireless crackers, sniffers, network spoofers and more.

HackForum Post
HackForum Post

Most tools are only available for Android smartphones, and many require root permissions. The most popular tool for cookie theft is DroidSheep. With the help of this tool, an attacker can collect all browsing data, including logins, passwords and more, merely by using the same Wi-Fi network as the victim.

Moreover, the attacker can connect to the victim’s password-protected Wi-Fi network. There are several Wi-Fi cracking tools, for example, WIBR+ uses uploaded password databases to identify passwords common to the victim’s network. The users can also upload and update these databases. Another tool – Wi-Fi Kill – is capable of shutting down any other device connected to the same network and can intercept pictures and webpages recently visited by users of this network.

More and more tools now include more than one hacking capability. The DSploit tool features such functions as password sniffers, cookie sniffers, browsing history sniffers, and webpage redirecting. Another program, Bugtroid, contains cracking and protection applications. The owner can choose the most suitable program from a list and install it in one click. The tool offers a variety of tools to suit almost every cracking purpose.

Sniffers and DDoS Tools
Sniffers and DDoS Tools

For iOS systems, there is a limited number of hacking tools, mostly in the realm of game cracking. Examples of such tools are GameGem and iGameGuardian. These tools break games for the purpose of stealing monetary units. The most common tool for iOS is Metasploit, which contains a number of useful applications for different fields.

The tools presented above are not new, but they represent the main capabilities in the field. We are seeing a growing tendency to use portable devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to conduct attacks in public places. Mobile devices and public Wi-Fi networks tend to be less protected and more vulnerable. With the help of collected data by mobile device, the attackers can perform more complex attacks via PC. As long as there is no protection awareness regarding mobile devices, we expected a continued increase in the number of smartphone-based attacks.

List of Hacking Tools
List of Hacking Tools

Gods, Monsters and Pandas – Threats Lurking in the Cyber Realm

With new viruses constantly being developed and new groups being formed all the time, hackers should use their creative minds to come up with original names to distinguish their tools/group from the rest. While some names are rather trite and corny, others are more amusing and curious. Generally speaking, the names usually fall under one of about ten categories. Here are a few examples:

The following are some elaborations on specific names:

Torshammer666: Thor’s hammer, or Mjölnir in Norse mythology, is depicted as one of the most powerful weapons, forged by the skillful hands of the dwarves. However, it seems that one Nordic god was not enough for this specific hacker, so he walked the extra mile and added the ominous number 666 to the tool name, to create an intimidating effect stemming from the thought of a Nordic-Satanic-almighty-weapon.

Fallaga: The famous Tunisian hacker group Fallaga is named after the anti-colonial movement that fought for the independence of Tunisia (there were also Fallaga warriors in Algeria). The character in the group’s logo resembles the original Fallaga fighters.

熊猫烧香 (Panda Burning Incense) – Everybody loves those adorable, chubby, harmless bears called Pandas! They are native to China, and serve as its national animal and mascot. As such, it is no wonder that panda-themed characters and cartoons figure extensively in China in various contexts, often symbolically representing China internationally. And now the pandas have even invaded the virus realm! In 2006-2007 the 熊猫烧香 virus infected millions of computers throughout China and led to the first-ever arrests in the country under virus-spreading charges. The ultimate goal of the virus was to install password-stealing Trojans, but it was its manifestation on the victim’s device that attracted a lot of attention: the virus replaced all infected files icons with a cute image of a panda holding three incense sticks in its hands, hence the name “Panda Burning Incense.”

Bozok (Turkish) – It may refer to one of the two branches (along with Üçok) in Turkish and Turkic legendary history from which three sons of Oghuz Khan (Günhan, Ayhan, and Yıldızhan) and their 12 clans are traced (from Wikipedia.)

推杆熊猫 (Putter Panda, putter=golf stick) – Another Panda-themed name. It is widely recognized that golf is the sport of white collar professionals, usually those on the upper end of the salary ladder. That is why, when these prominent figures travel abroad to a convention or on a business trip (and engage in semi-business/semi-pleasure golf activities), they are sometimes subjected to sophisticated hacker attacks, usually initiated by their host country, as suspected in the case of Putter Panda and its ties with the Chinese government.

As you read these lines, more tools are being written, and we can expect to continue to see more intriguing names. The Chinese idiom 卧虎藏龙 (literally: “crouching tiger, hidden dragon”), which was the inspiration for the successful namesake movie, nowadays actually means “hidden, undiscovered talents.” Maybe it is time the gifted tigers and dragons of the hacker community climbed out of their dark caves, stopped performing illegal activities, and put their pooled talents (be they computing or copywriting) to good use?

 

Where Does All the Data Go?

Written by Gal Landesman

We have recently learned of numerous data breaches targeting the healthcare industry that have exposed electronic personal healthcare information (ePHI). Just this month, a Chicago doctor’s email account, holding information on 1,200 patients, was accessed; a stolen laptop and flash drive jeopardized 2,500 patients’ data in Michigan; the investigation of the California Sutherland Healthcare Services data breach revealed that data pertaining to 338,700 individuals has been compromised; and La Palma Inter-community Hospital announced an old case of data breach involving one of their employees who accessed personal information without permission.

We are hearing about such incidents on an almost daily basis. Symantec even named 2013 the year of “Mega Breach”, with more than 552 million identities exposed this year. According to Symantec, the healthcare sector suffered the largest number of disclosed data breaches in 2013. They blame it on the large amount of personal information that healthcare organizations store and the high regulation standards requiring them to disclose data breaches. Still, the healthcare industry is one of the most impacted by data breaches this year.

Targeted data includes health insurance information, personal details and social security numbers. What could really happen if a patient’s personal data falls into the wrong hands?

Such breaches can cost their victims dearly – putting their health coverage at risk, causing legal problems or leading to inaccurate medical records. Attackers could make fraudulent insurance claims, obtain free medical treatment or addictive prescription drugs for personal use or resale.

Cyber criminals are definitely eyeing medical records. These records can fetch about $60 apiece on the black market, according to Norse-Sans that published a detailed report on the issue this February, claiming that such records are even more valuable than credit card information because they present criminals with greater opportunities for exploitation, such as insurance and prescription fraud. Norse-Sans identified a large volume of malicious traffic in their analysis of healthcare organization traffic.

Another example of interest was published by the Wall Street Journal, days before the Norse-Sans report, featuring valuable network information of healthcare facilities that was dumped on 4shared.com (a file-sharing site), including firewall brand, networking switch, Internet addresses of wireless access points, blueprints of the facilities, locations of PCs and printers and encryption keys, usernames and passwords that could be used for network access.

Here at SenseCy, we successfully traced the usage of breached medical information on Underground forums and the DarkNet. The following are some examples of prescription drugs for sale on the Underground:

Someone is offering Clonazepam (Klonopin), which affects chemicals in the brain, for sale:

Clonazepam

Another vendor offers different drugs, including ADDERALL-IR, a psychostimulant pharmaceutical drug, and Percocet, a narcotic pain reliever (containing opioid):

ADDERALL-IR

Information for sale:

Info_for_Sale

Info_for_Sale_2

Original prescriptions for sale:

Prescriptions

Prescriptions_2

 

 

SenseCy at the Defensive Cyberspace Operations & Intelligence (DCOI) Conference, Tel Aviv, April 8-9, 2014

We are proud to announce that SenseCy will be attending the DCOI Conference (Defensive Cyberspace Operations & Intelligence)!

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SenseCy CTO, Mr. Assaf Keren will be a panelist in a session discussing Cyber Intelligence, and we will host a two hour Seminar.

SenseCy Seminar will review the world of Cyber Intelligence and try to map which types of of data is available for companies and organizations that seek to defend themselves. We will do so utilizing real world intelligence collected and analyzed by SenseCy’s Cyber Intelligence analysts.  The seminar will be held on the second day of the conference (April, 9) at 14:00, at no extra cost. seats are limited so hurry and register!

For our friends and followers only – get a 20% discount off standard rate by using this coupon code: “944420” when registering.

SenseCy is Coming to RSA 2014 to Launch our Cyber Intelligence Portal

Hi All! We are very excited to announce that we are going to the RSA 2014 conference in San Francisco next week, to meet the industry’s brightest and launch our Cyber Intelligence Portal. SenseCy is focused on delivering effective cyber intelligence – our operation is based on strong OSINT and deep Virtual HUMINT capabilities, delivering actionable and relevant intelligence to our customers. Our new Cyber Intelligence Portal, currently in the Beta stages, supplies feed-based intelligence focused on hacktivism, cyber crime and cyber news.

The Hacktivism Feed is generated using our intimate knowledge of hacktivism and hacktivist groups. We are able to provide updates regarding global hacktivist operations, including time-sensitive alerts regarding planned activities (future “Ops”), current activities and traces of past activities (defacements).

Our Hacktivism Feeds include the following elements:

  • DDoS Alerts/Notices
  • Defacement Alerts/Notices
  • Campaign Alerts
  • Hacktivism Tools
  • Data Leakage Alerts
  • Group Alerts

Our Cybercrime Feed provides continual updates with regard to intent, trends and customer information or property being sold or distributed. Our analysts have successfully established the credibility of our virtual entities, resulting in their access to the most restricted underground areas.

The Cybercrime Feeds include the following elements:

  • Malware
  • Exploits/Vulnerabilities
  • Exposure of Client Data on the Underground
  • Certificates

The News Feed is the result of the work of SenseCy analysts, who continuously and meticulously collect information from a wide variety of sources, including cyber security blogs, professional forums and discussion groups, IT security vendor announcements, research papers and academic publications. This constant stream of information is automatically aggregated and then filtered by cyber security experts, to ensure that our clients receive only pertinent information and a concise news feed.

If you are interested in meeting us, or just chatting, drop us a line at info@sensecy.com

See you there!