Growing Awareness of the Darknet in China Following Huge Domestic Database Breaches

In recent weeks, we have identified a growing awareness on Chinese security blogs and mainstream media, to the existence of the Darknet, and the activities of Chinese users on its platforms. The focus is mostly on the sale of leaked data, mainly of Chinese citizens. One of these leaks pertained to the Huazhu hotel group, and was one of two major data breaches that occurred simultaneously in China, raising awareness to this issue. The second breach was the database of SF Express, a delivery service company based in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. Continue reading “Growing Awareness of the Darknet in China Following Huge Domestic Database Breaches”

Anonymous Italia Robs the Police (Again)

On October 12, 2016, Anonymous Italia launched a cyber offensive against the Polizia Penitenziaria (the Italian penitentiary police) to protest against the “unjust” acquittal of all those involved in the trial of Stefano Cucchi’s, a young Italian citizen who died in 2009 under still unclear circumstances a week after being remanded in custody by the Italian police for alleged drug dealing. Continue reading “Anonymous Italia Robs the Police (Again)”

#OpIsrael 2016 – Summary

This year, #OpIsrael hacktivists focused on defacing private websites, carrying out DDoS attacks and leaking databases. Hundreds of private Israeli websites were defaced, mostly by Fallaga and AnonGhost members. Various databases containing Israeli email addresses and credit cards were leaked, but the majority were recycled from previous campaigns.

The hacktivists attacks commenced on April 5, 2016, two days before the campaign was launched, with a massive DDoS attack against an Israeli company that provides cloud services. The fact that no one took responsibility for the attack, alongside the massive DDoS power invested, may indicate that threat actors with advanced technical abilities were responsible.

On April 7, 2016, approximately 2,650 Facebook users expressed their desire to participate in the campaign via anti-Israel Facebook event pages. There are several possible reasons for the low number of participants (compared for example to the 5,200 participants in #OpIsrael 2015). One reason might be disappointment in last year’s lack of significant achievements. Another reason could be the devotion of attention to other topics, such as the cyber campaign against the Islamic State (IS), in the wake of the recent terrorist attacks in Brussels. Moreover, it is possible that anti-Israel hacktivists have abandoned social media networks for other platforms, such as IRC and Telegram.

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Number of participants in the #OpIsrael campaign since 2014

During the campaign, we detected many indications of the use of common DDoS tools, such as HOIC, and simple DDoS web platforms that do not require any prior technical knowledge in order to operate them. Most of the DDoS attacks were directed against Israeli government and financial websites. Hacktivists claimed they managed to take down two Israeli bank websites. While this could be true, the websites were up and operational again within a short time. In addition, there were no indications of the use of RATs or ransomware against Israeli targets.

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Using common DDoS tools against an Israeli website

As mentioned previously, most of the leaked databases were recycled from previous campaigns. However, we noticed that almost all of the new leaked databases were stolen from the same source – an Israeli company that develop websites. Notably, during the 2014 #OpIsrael campaign, this company website appeared on a list of hacked websites.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the leakage of these databases, which raises many questions, since anti-Israel hacktivists typically publish their achievements on social media networks to promote the success of the campaign. Moreover, almost all of these databases were first leaked in the Darknet, but anti-Israel hacktivists do not use this platform at all. In addition, all of the data leakages were allegedly leaked by a hacker dubbed #IndoGhost, but there are no indications to suggest that this entity was involved in the #OpIsrael campaign or any other anti-Israel activity.

Finally, we detected several attempts to organize another anti-Israel campaign for May 7, 2016. As an example, we identified a post calling to hack Israeli government websites on this date. We estimate that these attempts will not succeed in organizing another anti-Israel cyber campaign.

After the Russian Yandex and Mail.ru, Gmail Accounts are Leaked. Who will be Tomorrow’s Target?

This morning cyber security sources informed us for the third time this week about email addresses and passwords being leaked from a large mail provider. After the Russian services Yandex.ru (one million leaked emails) and Mail.ru (4.5 million leaked emails), came Gmail’s turn – around five million emails were posted on a Russian platform.

According to publications about the Gmail leak, the data was published on a Russian forum that focuses on bitcoin issues – Bitcoin Security. The forum member who uploaded the database is nicknamed tvskit, and he was the first one to publish the data online in all three of the cases.

A short search on the above nickname on social networks revealed a 34-year old man by the name of Ivan Bragin, from the Perm administrative center in Russia. His VK and Twitter pages contain plenty of information regarding crypto-currencies, in addition to a tweet about the Gmail leak linked to the BTC forum. From his posts, it seems that he did not directly connect himself to the leaks, nor did he take credit for stealing the data. Moreover, the story he tells is about running into these email lists on the web, then deleting the passwords and publishing them ‘for the greater good’. It is a strange coincidence that all three lists were found by the same person.

Based on the fact that tvskit‘s real identity was so easy to find (no attempts to hide it from his side), combined with the fact that initially the account list was published without the passwords (“just in order for people to check if their address was on the list”), makes us doubt that he stole the data.

According to several cyber security sources that analyzed the database, some of the compromised mail accounts were either automatically registered or were not active in the past. Nevertheless, some users of the above providers did confirm the authenticity of the logins and passwords.

Yandex and Mail.ru denied any kind of breach of their databases, so the leading hypothesis of the accounts origin is that all three lists were collected over a long period of time, from different sources, maybe along with other, less “attractive” data, that was later sorted by email providers and published online. In addition, we should also consider that at least some of the addresses are fictitious or not valid. At this moment, it is difficult to specify the exact number of addresses with a valid password.

Relying on the information above, we believe that all three lists were obtained by the same person (not necessarily tvskit), who managed to get hold of some valid logins and passwords and then mixed them with non-valid or automatically created addresses to intensify the scale of the leak.

A forum thread Bitcoin Security forum, which cointians the leaked Gmail database on
A forum thread from Bitcoin Security forum, which cointains the leaked Gmail database
Ivan Bragin's Twit linked to the forum post about Gmail leak
Ivan Bragin’s tweet linked to the forum post about the Gmail leak