Intelligence Review of #OpIsrael Cyber Campaign (April 7, 2015)

Starting at the end of last week, hacktivist groups from around the Muslim world tried to attack Israeli websites, particularly those of government institutions, as part of the #OpIsrael cyber campaign. In the past twenty-four hours they stepped up their activity, but we have seen no signs of major attacks. Despite all the publicity prior to the campaign, the hackers’ successes were limited to defacing several hundred private websites and leaking the email addresses of tens of thousands of Israelis, many of them recycled from previous campaigns. Several dozen credit card numbers were also leaked on information-sharing websites, but our examination shows that some were recycled from past leaks.

AnonGhost, which initiated the campaign, was the main actor behind it. However, other groups of hackers, such as Fallaga, MECA (Middle East Cyber Army), Anon.Official.org, and Indonesian and Algerian groups also participated in the attacks. As the campaign progressed, we saw an increasing number of posts and tweets about it (over 3,000), but this is still significantly less than last year, when there were tens of thousands.

As we noted in previous updates, the campaign was conducted primarily on social networks, especially Facebook and Twitter. IRC channels opened for the campaign were barely active, partly because hackers feared spying by “intelligence agents.” On closed forums and Darknet platforms, we saw no activity related to #OpIsrael.

Participants discuss why the campaign is smaller than in 2013
Participants discuss why the campaign is smaller than in 2013

Following is a summary of the main results of the attacks that we have identified so far:

  • Defacing of hundreds of websites. Victims included Meretz (an Israeli political party), various Israeli companies, sub-domains of institutions of higher education, municipalities, Israeli artists, and more.
  • Leaking of tens of thousands of email addresses and personal information of Israelis. A significant portion of the information was recycled from previous campaigns. Databases from third-party websites were also leaked. In addition, two files were leaked and according to the hackers, one had 30,000 email addresses and the other 150,000 records.
  • Publication of details from dozens of credit cards, some of them recycled.

HACKoDROID: An Increasing Tendency Toward Smartphone-Based Attacks

New Smartphone technologies have made our lives easier. At the touch of a button, you can call a cab, pay bills, connect with your friends and even reach your personal trainer. On the other hand, the world of hacking and cracking now also has a lot of useful tools to hack your system and steal your data, using a smartphone.

We have recently seen the development and publishing of hack applications for smartphones on underground forums. The wide range of such tools means that anybody can find a suitable tool for dubious purposes. The items available include a variety of DDoS tools, wireless crackers, sniffers, network spoofers and more.

HackForum Post
HackForum Post

Most tools are only available for Android smartphones, and many require root permissions. The most popular tool for cookie theft is DroidSheep. With the help of this tool, an attacker can collect all browsing data, including logins, passwords and more, merely by using the same Wi-Fi network as the victim.

Moreover, the attacker can connect to the victim’s password-protected Wi-Fi network. There are several Wi-Fi cracking tools, for example, WIBR+ uses uploaded password databases to identify passwords common to the victim’s network. The users can also upload and update these databases. Another tool – Wi-Fi Kill – is capable of shutting down any other device connected to the same network and can intercept pictures and webpages recently visited by users of this network.

More and more tools now include more than one hacking capability. The DSploit tool features such functions as password sniffers, cookie sniffers, browsing history sniffers, and webpage redirecting. Another program, Bugtroid, contains cracking and protection applications. The owner can choose the most suitable program from a list and install it in one click. The tool offers a variety of tools to suit almost every cracking purpose.

Sniffers and DDoS Tools
Sniffers and DDoS Tools

For iOS systems, there is a limited number of hacking tools, mostly in the realm of game cracking. Examples of such tools are GameGem and iGameGuardian. These tools break games for the purpose of stealing monetary units. The most common tool for iOS is Metasploit, which contains a number of useful applications for different fields.

The tools presented above are not new, but they represent the main capabilities in the field. We are seeing a growing tendency to use portable devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to conduct attacks in public places. Mobile devices and public Wi-Fi networks tend to be less protected and more vulnerable. With the help of collected data by mobile device, the attackers can perform more complex attacks via PC. As long as there is no protection awareness regarding mobile devices, we expected a continued increase in the number of smartphone-based attacks.

List of Hacking Tools
List of Hacking Tools

Another Phish in the Sea

The rise in scamming campaigns has become a focal issue for the InfoSec world in recent years. More and more attacks have been targeting everyone from large corporates, by using specific techniques “tailored” for the target, to simple users, by spreading it to anyone available. The platforms from which the malware is spread vary from standard email messages and social networks to more complicated SMS scams.

We will attempt to describe herein the basic steps to take to determine if a suspicious email, text message or Facebook post is actually malicious – in order to stay safe from falling victim, while still being able to keep up with the latest 9GAG spam.

Source Identity

When receiving a new email or text message, check who the sender is. If the message comes from an unknown person – a source you are not expecting contact from or a strange looking email name – do not open it! Browsing social networks like Twitter can also lead you to malicious actors that will try to lure innocents and curious people.

One such example is a reservation email scam that “accidentally” sends a room reservation email to you instead of the hotel manager. The email has an attachment, purportedly containing a list of special requirements for the guests, which turns out to be a malicious element that downloads additional executable malware.

Another Phish in the Sea_1

Content

We have all heard the joke about receiving a scam email from a Nigerian prince, where the victim is asked to provide their bank account details in order to receive a large sum of money, but reality is not so far off. Attackers use sophisticated techniques to capture your attention, be it by intimidation, exploiting the latest trending topic or informing you of a transaction.

The recent iCloud hacking leak scandal has been a hot topic on the Internet, and the phishing attacks soon followed. The tweet, which tries to grab your attention by sharing a link to the alleged nude video of Jennifer Laurence, redirects visitors to a download page for a video converter. Of course, the downloaded file turned out to be adware, not to mention the fact that it forces its victims to share the malicious site on their Facebook profiles.

Another Phish in the Sea_2

Grammar

I believe that the easiest way to observe that something about a message of any kind is wrong is bad grammar. Foreign scammers who are not fluent in target audience languages encounter a barrier that they try to bypass by using online translators or just trying their luck at translating the message on their own. A poorly written letter from a formal organization or a shifty looking website should definitely raise a red flag.

Another Phish in the Sea_3

Links

Apart from the content itself, the message might also contain links. The URL that appears in the text might seem legitimate, but it is important to get a closer look at the domain name, in addition to ‘hovering’ over the link with a mouse to see if the actual web address is compatible with the one presented to you (for other fake-link-finding techniques, see our previous post).

Let’s say you received an email from the human resources department in your company – Sounds like a legitimate item to open. But what if it contains a link to download CryptoWall ransomware? In this particular situation, it is very difficult to distinguish whether this is phishing scam, but by taking a closer look at the shared link, you can notice if it redirects you to a gaming website and forces you to download a suspicious ZIP file that contains the malware.

Another Phish in the Sea_4

Attachments

Some scammers direct you to open files attached to their message. They might appear legitimate because they are Word or ZIP files, but they end up being disguised malware. Be aware of attachments you are not expecting to receive, especially executable files like .EXE, .PIF, .JAR, .BAT and .REG.

Curiosity killed the cat, and apparently also some people’s computers. An innocent-looking email suggesting that you view someone’s new photo contains an attachment called photo.zip, which unfortunately does not contain an attractive person’s selfie, but rather a Zbot Trojan.

And just like the old Japanese saying goes “Attack a man with a phish and you’ll scam him for a day; Teach a man to phish and you keep him safe for a lifetime.”

Another Phish in the Sea_5

After the Russian Yandex and Mail.ru, Gmail Accounts are Leaked. Who will be Tomorrow’s Target?

This morning cyber security sources informed us for the third time this week about email addresses and passwords being leaked from a large mail provider. After the Russian services Yandex.ru (one million leaked emails) and Mail.ru (4.5 million leaked emails), came Gmail’s turn – around five million emails were posted on a Russian platform.

According to publications about the Gmail leak, the data was published on a Russian forum that focuses on bitcoin issues – Bitcoin Security. The forum member who uploaded the database is nicknamed tvskit, and he was the first one to publish the data online in all three of the cases.

A short search on the above nickname on social networks revealed a 34-year old man by the name of Ivan Bragin, from the Perm administrative center in Russia. His VK and Twitter pages contain plenty of information regarding crypto-currencies, in addition to a tweet about the Gmail leak linked to the BTC forum. From his posts, it seems that he did not directly connect himself to the leaks, nor did he take credit for stealing the data. Moreover, the story he tells is about running into these email lists on the web, then deleting the passwords and publishing them ‘for the greater good’. It is a strange coincidence that all three lists were found by the same person.

Based on the fact that tvskit‘s real identity was so easy to find (no attempts to hide it from his side), combined with the fact that initially the account list was published without the passwords (“just in order for people to check if their address was on the list”), makes us doubt that he stole the data.

According to several cyber security sources that analyzed the database, some of the compromised mail accounts were either automatically registered or were not active in the past. Nevertheless, some users of the above providers did confirm the authenticity of the logins and passwords.

Yandex and Mail.ru denied any kind of breach of their databases, so the leading hypothesis of the accounts origin is that all three lists were collected over a long period of time, from different sources, maybe along with other, less “attractive” data, that was later sorted by email providers and published online. In addition, we should also consider that at least some of the addresses are fictitious or not valid. At this moment, it is difficult to specify the exact number of addresses with a valid password.

Relying on the information above, we believe that all three lists were obtained by the same person (not necessarily tvskit), who managed to get hold of some valid logins and passwords and then mixed them with non-valid or automatically created addresses to intensify the scale of the leak.

A forum thread Bitcoin Security forum, which cointians the leaked Gmail database on
A forum thread from Bitcoin Security forum, which cointains the leaked Gmail database
Ivan Bragin's Twit linked to the forum post about Gmail leak
Ivan Bragin’s tweet linked to the forum post about the Gmail leak