Intelligence Review of #OpIsrael Cyber Campaign (April 7, 2015)

Starting at the end of last week, hacktivist groups from around the Muslim world tried to attack Israeli websites, particularly those of government institutions, as part of the #OpIsrael cyber campaign. In the past twenty-four hours they stepped up their activity, but we have seen no signs of major attacks. Despite all the publicity prior to the campaign, the hackers’ successes were limited to defacing several hundred private websites and leaking the email addresses of tens of thousands of Israelis, many of them recycled from previous campaigns. Several dozen credit card numbers were also leaked on information-sharing websites, but our examination shows that some were recycled from past leaks.

AnonGhost, which initiated the campaign, was the main actor behind it. However, other groups of hackers, such as Fallaga, MECA (Middle East Cyber Army), Anon.Official.org, and Indonesian and Algerian groups also participated in the attacks. As the campaign progressed, we saw an increasing number of posts and tweets about it (over 3,000), but this is still significantly less than last year, when there were tens of thousands.

As we noted in previous updates, the campaign was conducted primarily on social networks, especially Facebook and Twitter. IRC channels opened for the campaign were barely active, partly because hackers feared spying by “intelligence agents.” On closed forums and Darknet platforms, we saw no activity related to #OpIsrael.

Participants discuss why the campaign is smaller than in 2013
Participants discuss why the campaign is smaller than in 2013

Following is a summary of the main results of the attacks that we have identified so far:

  • Defacing of hundreds of websites. Victims included Meretz (an Israeli political party), various Israeli companies, sub-domains of institutions of higher education, municipalities, Israeli artists, and more.
  • Leaking of tens of thousands of email addresses and personal information of Israelis. A significant portion of the information was recycled from previous campaigns. Databases from third-party websites were also leaked. In addition, two files were leaked and according to the hackers, one had 30,000 email addresses and the other 150,000 records.
  • Publication of details from dozens of credit cards, some of them recycled.

#OpIsrael Campaign – April 7, 2015: Cyber Intelligence Review

Background

This is the third round of the anti-Israel cyber campaign called #OpIsrael. The hacktivists are highly motivated to attack Israel, and they have been gradually building their campaign infrastructures on social media networks. Many have been posting videos with threatening messages in the leadup to April 7. AnonGhost, which is behind the campaign, has announced that it will cooperate with three anti-Israel groups known from previous campaigns: Fallaga, MECA (Middle East Cyber Army), and Anon Official Arabe.

Official announcement from AnonGhost on future cooperation
Official announcement from AnonGhost on future cooperation

Most of the social media discussions about the campaign are taking place in the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Asia, Western Europe, and the United States (the attackers appear to be using proxy services). In addition, during March 2015 the number of Twitter tweets about the campaign increased by hundreds per day. Nevertheless, it is important to note that during the campaign, there will likely be several thousand or even tens of thousands of tweets a day, as was the case during previous campaigns.

Increase in the number of tweets about #OpIsrael per day in March 2015
Increase in the number of tweets about #OpIsrael per day in March 2015

Prominent Participants

At the time of writing, the number of participants is about 5,000. The most prominent groups in the campaign are from North Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Groups of hackers from South America, such as Anonymous Chile and Anon Defense Brasil, and hackers affiliated with Anonymous have also expressed support for the campaign. We have not yet seen evidence of active involvement or public support for the campaign by cyberterrorist groups.

Attack Targets

The attack targets recommended by those participating in the campaign are government websites, financial websites such as the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange’s or the Bank of Israel’s, academic websites, telecom websites, and media websites. These lists are familiar from previous anti-Israel campaigns.

In addition, AnonGhost and Fallaga leaked a list of hundreds of telephone numbers of Israeli officials from an unknown source to point out potential targets for anti-Israel text messages or phishing attacks, such as those that took place during #OpSaveGaza.

Post from AnonGhost threatening to send messages to Israeli telephone numbers
Post from AnonGhost threatening to send messages to Israeli telephone numbers

Attack Tools

The attack tools we have identified so far mostly appear in lists that include links for downloading the tools. Most of these lists are well-known from previous anti-Israel campaigns. However, we identified several unique self-developed tools created specifically for the campaign:

  • AnonGhost DDoS – A DDoS tool developed by AnonGhost, which initiated the campaign.
  • LOIC Fallaga – A DDoS tool developed by Fallaga. This tool was developed for an anti-Israel hacktivist operation that took place on March 20 of this year, but we expect that hacktivists will use it in the #OpIsrael campaign as well.

Cyber Campaign against French Websites

In response to the recent escalations in France and the Anonymous #OpCharlieHebdo cyber campaign against Islamic extremists platforms, hundreds of French websites have been defaced by Muslim hacktivist groups (mostly from North Africa, such as the Tunisian hacker group dubbed Fallaga).

The famous hacktivist group Middle East Cyber Army (MECA) created an #OpFrance Facebook event page for organizing cyber-attacks against French websites on January 15, 2015. Another famous hacktivist group Fallaga created a similar event page that organized an anti-France cyber-attack on January 10, 2015.

MECA #OpFrance event page
MECA #OpFrance event page

Additionally, the famous hacktivist group AnonGhost has made calls on several social media platforms to hack French websites. The group also uploaded a video to YouTube, in which they explain their motive to act against French websites: “In reaction of France’s crimes against Muslims in Mali, Syria, Center Africa & Iraq, bombing mosques, killing innocents, under the banner of ‘fighting terrorism.'”

Finally, motivation to hack French websites is high and the anti-France message is quickly spreading via social media platforms.