School Is Now in Session – The Spread of Hacking Tutorials in the Deep and Dark Web

One of the most common posts seen on hacker forums is “Hello, I’m new and I want to be a hacker.” Any aspiring hacker must learn coding, networking, system security, and the like, and increasingly, hacking forums are responding to this demand and providing tutorials for those who wish to learn the basics quickly.

Hacking forums have two main kinds of tutorial sections, one open to any forum member and the other exclusively for VIP members. In this post we will review two case studies from closed forums, one from the onion network and the other from the Deep Web.

Case Studies

The first tutorial, taken from a closed forum in the onion network, is actually four tutorials wrapped together to teach POS (point-of-sale) hacking. It includes a list of essential malware and software for POS hacking. While it starts with a basic overview of POS and of RAM (random-access memory) scraping, it very quickly dives into explanations that require an advanced understanding of hacking.

POS tutorial in the onion network
POS tutorial in the onion network

The second tutorial is a basic PayPal hacking tutorial, taken from a closed forum on the Deep Web and oriented toward noobs (beginners). It is actually more about scamming than hacking. It notes that one way to get user details is to hack vulnerable shopping sites using SQL injections and explains how to check whether the stolen user details are associated with a PayPal account. It also mentions that user details can simply be acquired from posts on the forum.

PayPal tutorial on closed forum
PayPal tutorial on closed forum

What is really interesting is that this practical forum has many tutorial sections and sub-sections (we counted six), which raises an interesting question: Why do hackers share?

Motives

There is no one answer to this question, but we can divide hackers’ motivations into four categories:

  • Self-promotion – One of the differences between regular hackers and good hackers is reputation. The most obvious way for hackers to improve their reputation is of course to perform a good hack, but they can also enhance their reputation by being part of a well-known hacking team or displaying vast knowledge, such as by publishing tutorials. It appears that Red, a junior member of the onion network forum who is not known and has a small number of posts, is increasing his value in the eyes of other forum members and site administrators by publishing tutorials, including the POS tutorial. This improved reputation can give him new privileges, such as access to the forum’s VIP sections. In most cases, tutorials shared for this reason range from beginner to intermediate level and can be understand by almost any beginner.
  • Site promotion – Commerce in hacking forums hiding deep in the Internet works like any other free market: if you have the right goods, people will come and your business will boom, but if your shop does not look successful, customers will stay away. Hacking forums, like other businesses, compete for the attention of their target audience. The PayPal tutorial was published by BigBoss, a site administrator, who was probably seeking publicity for the site. To ensure that there is a large number of tutorials on the site, the administrators publish their own from time to time. These can be very simple (as in this case) or very specialized and technical (such as those offered in closed forum sections).
  • Financial gain – As we noted, these forums are businesses, and like any business, they need to sell products in order to make a profit. They can do this by creating VIP sections with unique content (such as special tutorials) open to paying members only, as opposed to VIP sections based on reputation or Individual members also use the forums for financial gain and sell more concrete items—malware, credit cards, and the like—or more abstract items, like knowledge in the form of tutorials or lessons. In most cases the tutorials are very advanced, with extensive details, so that their creators can charge for them.
A forum member selling his knowledge
A forum member selling his knowledge
  • Knowledge sharing — Sometimes, people share their knowledge without any ulterior motive. This is usually done in a closed section of a forum and only with prime members or a group of friends. In this case, the knowledge shared varies according to the group and can be state-of-the-art or very simple.

Conclusions

In a society based heavily on information, we cannot escape the frequently rehashed concept that “knowledge is power.” As the technology world continues to evolve and the hacker community along with it, the need for “how to” knowledge is growing. Tutorials provide beginners with an effective gateway into the world of hacking and expose advanced users to new methods of operation. For us, the observers, they provide a small glimpse into developing trends, attack methods, methods of assessing hacker knowledge, and much more.

SenseCy 2014 Annual Cyber Intelligence Report

Written and prepared by SenseCy’s Cyber Intelligence analysts.

Executive Summary

Clearly, 2014 was an important year in the cyber arena. The technical level of the attacks, the variety of tools and methods used and the destructive results achieved have proven, yet again, that cyber is a cross-border tool that is rapidly gaining momentum.

This year, we witnessed attacks on key vectors: cyber criminals setting their sights on targets in the private sector, hacktivists using cyber tools for their ideological struggles, state-sponsored campaigns to facilitate spying on high-profile targets, and cyber conflicts between countries.

The following is an excerpt from an annual report prepared by our Cyber Intelligence analysts. To receive a copy, please send a request to: info@sensecy.com

Insights

Below are several of our insights regarding cyber activity this past year:

  • The financial sector was and continues to be a key target for cyber criminals, with most of the corporations hacked this year in the U.S. being attacked through infection of Point-of-Sale (POS) systems. Despite the high level of awareness as to the vulnerability of these systems following the Target breach at the end of 2013, ever more organizations are continuing to fall victim to these types of attacks, as the cybercrime community develops and sells dedicated tools for these systems.
  • In 2014, we saw another step up in the use of cyber as a cross-border weapon, the use of which can be highly destructive. This was evidenced in the attack on JPMorgan, which according to reports was a response to sanctions imposed by the U.S. on Russia. The ensuing Sony breach and threats to peoples’ lives should the movie The Interview be screened exacerbated the state of asymmetrical war in cyber space, where on the one hand, we see countries attacking companies, and on the other, groups of hackers attacking countries. This trend becomes even more concerning following the reports of the deaths of three workers at a nuclear reactor in South Korea, after it became the target of a targeted cyber-attack, evidently by North Korean entities.
  • This past year was rife with campaigns by anti-Israel hacktivist campaigns, whose motivation for attacking Israel’s cyber networks was especially strong. Again, it was clearly demonstrated that the relationship between physical and virtual space is particularly strong, when alongside Operation Protective Edge (July-August 2014), we witnessed a targeted cyber campaign by hacktivist organizations from throughout the Muslim world (but not only) and by cyber terror groups, which in some cases were able to score significant successes. We believe that in 2015, attacks by hacktivist groups will become higher quality (DDoS attacks at high bandwidth, for example) and the use of vectors, which to date have been less common, such as attacks against mobile devices, will become increasingly frequent.
  • Involvement of the internal factor in cyber-attacks: According to some speculations published recently in the global media regarding the massive Sony breach, former company employees  may have abused their positions and status to steal confidential information and try to harm the organization. This underscores the importance of information security and internal compartmentalization in organizations with databases containing sensitive information.

The Past Year on the Russian Underground

In 2014, we saw active underground trading of malware and exploits, with some of them being used in attacks inside and outside Russia that gained widespread media coverage in sources dealing with information security.

The following is a list of categories of malware and the main services offered for sale in 2014 on the Russian-speaking underground forums. Note that in this analysis, we only included important tools that were well-received by the buyers, which indicates their reliability and level of professionalism. Additionally, only tools that were sold for over a month were included. Let us also note that the analysis does not include special PoS firmware, but only programs designed to facilitate remote information theft through takeover of the terminal.

Malware_Russian Underground

Prices

The average price of a tool offered for sale in 2014 was $1,500. Since 2013, the average price has increased by $500. The following graph lists the average price in each of the categories outlined above (in USD):

Average_Price_by_Category

Key Trends Observed on the Russian Underground this Past Year

Trojan Horses for the Financial Sector

Malware designed to target financial institutions is a highly sought-after product on the Russian underground, and this past year we observed the development of malware based on Kronos source code – Zeus, Chthonic (called Udacha by the seller) and Dyre malware. Additionally, the sale of tools designed to sell login details for banking sites via mobile devices were also observed.

In this context, it should be noted that the modular structure of many types of financial malware allows flexibility by both the seller and the buyer. Most financial malware is sold in this format – meaning, various modules responsible for the malware’s activity can be purchased separately: Formgrabber module, Web-Injections module and more.

MitM Attacks

This type of attack vector, known to cyber criminals as Web injections, is most common as a module in Trojan horses for the financial sector. Members of many forums offer their services as injection writers, referring to creation of malware designed to be integrated into a specific banking Trojan horse (generally based on Zeus), tailored to the specific bank, which imitates the design of its windows, etc. In 2014, we saw this field prosper, with at least seven similar services offered on the various forums.

Ransomware

This year we witnessed a not insignificant amount of ransomware for sale on Russian-speaking forums. It would appear that the forums see a strong potential for profit through this attack vector and therefore invest in the development of ransomware. Furthermore, note that some of the ransomware uses the Tor network to better conceal the command and control servers. Since CryptoLocker was discovered in September 2013, we have seen numerous attempts at developing similar malware both for PCs and laptops.

Additional trends and insights are detailed in the full report.

Recent Trends from the Russian Underground

Being a successful hacker can be a very demanding profession. Maybe the most important trait required for this job is being innovative and keeping updated of recent trends. Just like in physical fitness – a couple of weeks away from of the gym, and you feel left out of the loop – such is the case with hacking. You take sick leave from the cybercrime scene for a brief period of time and when you return, you feel like a lot has changed. This scene is very dynamic: new threats and vulnerabilities are constantly being discovered and then patches and security updates released; new Trojans are sold on the underground and then the source code is leaked, rendering them of no interest anymore. Something is always going on.

This time, we want to draw your attention to recent trends identified on the Russian underground, from leading forums and other web-platforms.

Untitled

A Wider Variety of Crypt (Obfuscation) Services for sale on Trading Platforms

We have observed a sharp increase in threads offering crypt services for malware files lately. In the last month alone, we traced at least 20 active threads advertising crypt services for .exe or .dll files on different forums. There is a wide assortment and the prices are competitive. You can choose between a one-time service for $15 – $50 per file or a monthly subscription for a service starting at $150 for a new vendor and $500 for a well-known, time-honored service.

The main purpose of the crypt is to bypass AV, firewalls, browsers and malware detection, etc. and it is valid for 24-72 hours on average. Increased offerings of this service indicate a growing demand, which may be motivated by two main reasons: increased volume of activity linked to botnets and difficulty in bypassing security mechanisms that are becoming more sophisticated. Actually, we think it is a combination of the two – more and more cyber criminals are attracted to easy profits from running a botnet, while security firms try to fight back and refine their defense mechanisms. The crypt services happened to be in the right place at the right time to rake in the money.

More Malware Using Tor Browser

In recent months, new Tor-based malware has appeared on underground trading platforms. The newest is a TOR Android bot named “Slempo” and a TorLocker Ransomware (the first one rented for $500 per month after a connection cost of $1000 and the second one is sold for $200). Before that, we saw Atrax HTTP Tor Bot, whose admin panel is located on a TOR browser.

Using Tor hidden services provides anonymity to the botnet operator, as it is almost impossible to reveal the identities of TOR users. The disadvantage of this method is the large size of the malware files and the significant resources needed to manage such a botnet, owing to the integration of TOR.

As we see it, this may turn out to be quite an alarming trend, making the detection of botnets and their initiators that much more difficult.

Greater Focus Granted to Firmware Attacks

As previously mentioned, cyber-criminals wage a constant battle against evolving defense mechanisms. While more and more obstacles are placed in the path of the hacker seeking to access your PC, his path to firmware devices such as ATM and POS remains almost clear. The operating system of these devices is usually the common Windows XP, and due to their physical aspects (the possibility of inserting physical malware into an ATM, for instance), it is much harder to protect them.

Hackers have also discovered this vector – we were recently privy to numerous discussions about ways to attack ATMs, as well as an increasing number of POS malware for sale and download.

In our opinion, we may be witnessing a gradual shift in the main targets of cyber-criminals – from the personal PC to large-scale devices of organizations. Recent attacks executed via POS devices on Target, Neiman Marcus and other retailers merely corroborate this claim.

SenseCy is coming to town! Come meet us at the RSA USA 2014 conference, February 24-28, in San Francisco.

Cyber Criminals “TARGET” Point of Sale Devices

In the wake of breaches at retailers from Target through Neiman Marcus, cumulating in CNET’s publication on January 12 that at least three more retailers have been breached, we can see a renewed focus on cybercrime in the retail world, always a prime target for credit card theft. Moreover, the carding and underground crowds have become so skilled in the theft and sale of credit cards that days after the attack on Target, the stolen cards were already on sale.

Powering this trend is Point of Sale (POS) malware. In recent years, we have identified increased underground activity in the sale and development of POS malware, with Dexter and Project Hook being the most notable. Howbeit, wherever there is a need, there is a market, so the world is not limited to these specific malwares. A case in point was versions of vSkimmer, POS.CardStealer and Dump Memory Grabber that our analysts came across last month. These are all dedicated Windows-based POS malwares developed in early 2013, but prevalent to this day.

Spy.POSCardStealer

A known POS-Trojan detected by anti-viruses since January 2013. The malware builder was uploaded to the closed Russian forum exploit in December 2013. This tool was analyzed in the Xylibox.com blog in detail, revealing that it searches for Track 2 data from the magnetic strip of the credit card, which is stored in the POS device, and then sends it to the C&C.

vSkimmer POS Trojan

A POS-Trojan that was sold on the Russian underground during 2012 and early in 2013. In March 2013, the builder was uploaded to exploit.in for free download but after a short time it was deleted and uploaded again in October 2013. The Botnet based on this tool was discovered in February 2013 and was widely considered to be Dexter’s successor, with additional functions. The malware detects the card readers, grabs all the information from the Windows machines attached to them, and sends the data to a control server.

DUMP MEMORY GRABBER (Black POS)

A POS-Trojan sold in the Russian underground since February 2013 (a video of the malware in action is available upon request). The malware identifies the running process associated with the credit card reader and steals payment card Track 1 and Track 2 data from its memory. The price ranges from $1,800-$2,300 (as of April 2013).

Original post uploaded by the malware seller
Original post uploaded by the malware seller

Conclusion and Recommendations

It seems that the Target breach is poised to be the TJX of the POS world. If TJX brought about a complete rethinking of how credit cards should be processed through the enterprise back-end and in turn gave us PCI-DSS, I think that it is clear today that progress in PA-DSS and the work performed by the POS machine providers is still insufficient to protect customers. It is very likely that we will start to see technologies that are today directed against APT detection in enterprise computers being shifted to POS networks, and perhaps even developing companies and retailers taking a step back from Windows-based machines toward more dedicated, hardened operating systems. Retailers (both large and small) that wish to take action against the threat of card theft should:

  1. Contact their POS supplier and make sure it complies with PA-DSS.
  2. Ensure the POS system is fully up-to-date (and with the death of Windows XP – installed on Windows 7 and up).
  3. Ensure there are security systems (both whitelist- and blacklist-based) installed on the POS system.
  4. Install network-based security systems on the POS network connection.
  5. Be aware of the threat and how to locate and mitigate it.