Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior’s e-Magazine : TeknoDE

Cyber Warrior is one of the biggest hacker groups in Turkey. The group was established in 1999. Their first significant cyber-attack was in 2003, when they launched a massive operation against 1,500 U.S. websites in protest against the American invasion of Iraq and a specific incident where Turkish military personnel in northern Iraq were captured and interrogated by the U.S. Army.

Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior
Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior

Cyber Warrior (CW) comprises teams for strategy, intelligence, logistics, R&D and a dedicated unit for waging cyber-attacks named Akincilar. In recent weeks, for examples, Akincilar has attacked official government websites of countries that discriminate against their Muslim populations, in their opinion.

Additionally, CW has been active developing cyber tools and improving others. They even write instructional manuals on cyber security and have established a Cyber Academy, where they provide online training.

In September 2014, the group published their first monthly e-Magazine. The magazine is published on their online platforms and it includes cyber news items from the IT world, new technologies, cyber security, hacking news, programming and more.

September 2014 issue of TeknoDE
September 2014 issue of TeknoDE

In their first issue, they featured a cryptography contest with the top prize of a book, mug and mouse pad.

Cryptography Contest
Cryptography Contest

In their October issue, they reviewed the recently discovered Shellshock vulnerability, shared information on how to locate a lost mobile phone and discussed ways to hack into Gmail accounts, and aircraft and satellite systems.

October 2014 issue of TeknoDE
October 2014 issue of TeknoDE

A couple of weeks ago, they produced the November 2014 issue, featuring articles about credit card frauds, new Android malware and interviews with Cyber Warrior founders.

November 2014 issue of TeknoDE

 

Currently, the magazine is in Turkish and it increases awareness of the Cyber world for users, while promoting an interest in cyber security among them.

Members of the website and readers of CWTeknoDE will not only be motivated to hack, but with this magazine they will have chance to learn more about the cyber world, and methods and vulnerabilities.

Related Posts


Did Turkish Hackers Actually Hack the Israeli “Iron Dome”? on August 18, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

Turkish Government Bans Twitter and Hijacks IP Addresses for Popular DNS Providers on March 31, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

RedHack – A Turkish Delight on February 5, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

Turkish Government Bans Twitter and Hijacks IP Addresses for Popular DNS Providers

Written by Sheila Dahan

On March 20, Twitter was banned in Turkey by the order of the Turkish Government, owing to the dissemination of an audio clip about the corruption of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan via Twitter. The authorities inundated Twitter with hundreds of court rulings ordering them to remove the content, but Twitter has yet to respond.

Twitter users reliant on local Internet providers who attempted to log onto Twitter were redirected to a page showing the court’s decision.

In response, users changed their DNS servers to international providers such as Google’s DNS service and OpenDNS. This appears to be a good method for bypassing the censorship. Following the ban, Twitter usage in Turkey increased 138%!

On March 22, the government blocked Twitter’s IP address in order to thwart those using international servers from accessing the site.

Twitter's IP addresses are blocked from Turkey
Twitter’s IP addresses are blocked from Turkey

On March 29, Turk Telekom (The Turkish state-owned telecommunications company) started to hijack the IP addresses of popular free, open DNS providers, such as the Google 8.8.8.8, the OpenDNS 208.67.222.222 and the Level3 4.2.2.2., using the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). This made Turkey the first country to ever block Google DNS. Google software engineer Steven Carstensen posted that “Turkish ISPs have set up servers that masquerade as Google’s DNS service.”

Turk Telekom hijacking Google DNS
Turk Telekom hijacking Google DNS

Turk Telekom’s hijacking of the IP addresses of popular DNS servers is a very worrying development because it may help the Turkish government to intercept traffic and spy on the Turkish population.

This recent Turkish Internet censorship has made the TOR browser, which protects users’ anonymity and privacy, a very popular tool inside Turkey. Take a look at the following statistics, and the number leap after the recent steps taken by the government:

Users connected directly to the Tor network from Turkey
Users connected directly to the TOR network from Turkey

RedHack – A Turkish Delight

On February 4, 2014, it was reported that members of the RedHack group hacked into the systems of three major telecoms companies: TTNET (Turkey’s largest ISP), Vodafone and Turkcell (the leading mobile phone operator of Turkey). The hackers claim to have obtained large amounts of data, and thus far they have published online information that belongs to Turkish officials and government employees, including names, ID numbers, phone numbers, email addresses and more.

RedHack is a Turkish Marxist–Leninist computer hacker group founded in 1997. The group has claimed responsibility for hacking institutions that include the Council of Higher Education, the Turkish police force, the Turkish Army, Türk Telekom, and the National Intelligence Organization. The group’s core numbers are said to be 12 but the group has hundreds of supporters and over 700,000 followers on Twitter.

RedHack's official Twitter account
RedHack’s official Twitter account

RedHack first made a name for themselves by hacking the Ankara Police Department’s official site in 2012, and later launched a number of attacks against governmental websites, including the Finance and Interior ministries, as well as the Religious Affairs Directorate.

During the last month the group has waged several high-profile attacks against Turkish entities: On January 16, 2014, the group leaked the phone numbers of over 4,000 people who work for Turkcell; On January 15, members of RedHack breached the systems of the General Directorate of the EGO, which serves as the Public Transports Department in Ankara. On January 11, hackers from the group waged several cyber attacks against a number of Turkish organizations, such as the Parliament, the Turkish State Railways, and the Justice and Development Party (AKP).

We believe that in the near future RedHack will continue to focus on attacking official Turkish entities. An interesting observation is their shift from defacing governmental websites to breaching major organizational systems and leaking sensitive information.

Related Posts


Turkish Hacking Group Cyber Warrior’s e-Magazine : TeknoDE on December 18, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

Did Turkish Hackers Actually Hack the Israeli “Iron Dome”? on August 18, 2014 by Sheila Dahan

Turkish Government Bans Twitter and Hijacks IP Addresses for Popular DNS Providers on March 31, 2014 by Sheila Dahan